George Kordatos UI/UX Designer at useberry

UX industry analysis (2020)

2 min read

I am a designer. Since you are reading this post, chances are you are considered one too. So far so good. But, honestly, what exactly are we? Isn’t a title like “designer” kind of vague to describe what we do? 

You might answer “Yes, that’s the reason we’ve put cool pointing words before the “designer word” like UX, UI, product, visual, interaction” and the list goes on; to describe what we do. 

Call me nuts, but I believe that if we don’t erase the “designer” title soon, we will certainly have issues in the near future when we will need to build a new framework for the UX industry’s job roles. As a matter of fact, we already have.

Anyway, today’s post scope is to provide you with information regarding the current state in the UX industry. 

Disclaimer: All the data presented below was retrieved by secondary research (latest studies, papers, and popular blogs) for the sake of giving our readers a feeling of how the UX industry is being transformed. 

UX is finally popular. As of speaking, there are 1,346,453 professionals on LinkedIn (379,371 live in the United States) claiming to have a direct relation to UX. In this number, you should also consider freelancers, students and people looking for a job. The most prominent roles on LinkedIn are “UX designer” and “product designer”.

Speaking of jobs, there are 160,980 open UX jobs on LinkedIn alone, with almost ⅓ of them being in the United States (64,624). As expected, California is the state that demands the most UX roles. In Europe, the United Kingdom seems to be the country with the most UX job roles (17,000) with Germany following with 9,500. There appears to be a continuous demand for UX roles which also pushes the salaries up.

Salary expectations

As a matter of fact, the current salaries are considered among the highest with the average pay for a typical UX designer being around $50,000 in the UK and $85,000 in the US.

United kingdom

Associate User Experience Designer 

Average/year: $35,747 

Highest/year $47,000

Lowest/year: $30,000


Interaction designer

Average/year: $49100

Highest/year: $70147

Lowest/year: $36986


User experience architect

Average/year: $50851

Highest/year $70147

Lowest/year: $38262


User experience designer

Average/year: $50807

Highest/year $71422

Lowest/year: $35711


User experience researcher

Average/year: $51642

Highest/year $84177

Lowest/year: $34436


User experience research manager

Average/year: $74038

Highest/year $96931

Lowest/year: $51016


Senior User experience researcher

Average/year: $75848

Highest/year $109685

Lowest/year: $57393


User experience director

Average/year: $125561

Highest/year $198963

Lowest/year: $95655

United States

Associate User Experience Designer 

Average/year: $77,384

Highest/year $117,000

Lowest/year: $53,000


Interaction designer

Average/year: $76,000

Highest/year: $101,000

Lowest/year: $47,000


User experience architect

Average/year: $73,821

Highest/year $106,000

Lowest/year: $45,000


User experience designer

Average/year: $85,277

Highest/year $128,000

Lowest/year: $59,000


User experience researcher

Average/year: $94,765

Highest/year $127,000

Lowest/year: $68,000


User experience research manager

Average/year: $64,252

Highest/year $87,000

Lowest/year: $41,000


Senior User experience researcher

Average/year: $113,383

Highest/year $149,000

Lowest/year: $83,000


User experience director

Average/year: $152,898

Highest/year $201,000

Lowest/year: $111,000

UX designer

Australia – $57,691

Japan – $53,000

France – $47,152

Germany – $33,058


Education

Okay, the salaries are good. How does someone become a UX pro though? Actually, it has never been easier.  All you gotta do is start learning and getting experience. According to research, 50% of the UX workforce appears to be self-taught (including those that UX wasn’t their primary subject in college/uni). In the future, we might see a shift towards online programs and of course an increase in interest by academia.

Skills on demand

Since UX has become more sophisticated, the basic skills for a UX designer have become far more. While you will still need some design education, editing, UX writing, wireframing and of course an understanding in coding (HTML, CSS, Javascript, React), job roles are now also looking for previous experience in user research (previously a job role by itself) and usability testing. There is also an increase in demand for soft skills, something that was not considered important in the past.

What the Future beholds for UX

6 quick predictions/estimations:

  1. Usability is going to be the next “designer word” -read again the 2nd paragraph
  2. Increase of more remote jobs 
  3. Increase of inhouse UX job roles
  4. Increase in outsourcing UX work to 3rd parties
  5. UX will go beyond the internet as it is today
  6. Ux will enter previously unimagined fields
George Kordatos UI/UX Designer at useberry
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